AARP International
Interview with Barbara Beskind
  • Jan 01, 2017
  • AARP

Interview with Barbara Beskind

Meet Barbara Beskind, a 93-year-old designer who uses age to her advantage by inventing products that improve the quality of life for older people.

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  • BREAKING NEWS
    • Aug 15, 2019

    Platform helps people in New Zealand keep working after 60

    Seniors@work is a platform which connects senior job seekers with employers eager to have older workers. Managing Director Ian Fraser created the platform after having his own difficulties re-entering the workforce after a job setback in his 60s. After discovering that there was no platform for older workers to find employment, Fraser decided to create one himself. Still a new enterprise, Fraser hopes more job seekers and employers sign up to the platform, which had 475 job seekers and 15 jobs listed at last count. more info

    • Aug 14, 2019

    Age Scotland calls for greater investment in health, social care as population ages

    A charity is calling for more investment in health care for older people as new figures highlighted Scotland's aging population. Statistics published by the National Records of Scotland (NRS) show 19% of Scots were aged 65 and over in 2018, compared with 16% a decade before. The figures predict that by 2038, a quarter of the population will be 65 and over, placing a far greater demand on health and care services. Age Scotland said it's vital Scotland is fit for the future with more investment in health and social care. It also called for better support for older people in the workplace, and for employers to become more age-inclusive. more info

    • Aug 14, 2019

    Group purchases abandoned Spanish village to live out their retirement

    A group of friends raised over $155,000 to purchase a hamlet in the countryside that has stood empty for 50 years. Although presently in a state of ruin, each investor plans to renovate an individual property within the settlement with the idea that they can all live there in their retirement. The village includes one larger property, two cottages, several barns that could be converted into livable spaces, a traditional bread oven and a pair of traditional Galician granaries. more info

    • Aug 14, 2019

    Canadian senior care centers hold summer camps for residents

    Senior care centers across Canada held a two-day camp for their residents. These camps are designed to get the elderly campers active, motivated, and involved with their community. The centers held events, such as readings, special guests, art and dance classes and even roasting marshmallows. more info

    • Aug 14, 2019

    Two-thirds of Canadians worry about outliving savings

    A study from the Angus Reid Institute, in a series examining aspects of the aging process, finds Canadians over the age of 30 are a divided population when it comes to their feelings about aging. While 6% say they fear growing older, 15% say they welcome it. The rest fit into three more equivalent categories - they fear it more than they welcome it (22%), welcome it more than they fear it (20%) or feel an equal mix of both (37%). For Canadians over the age of 70 - the prospect of aging is less scary than for younger people. Just one-in-five look upon aging with worry (21%). More key findings include:

    • Canadians generally have a positive outlook on their current well-being. Eight-in-10 (79%) describe their physical health as "good" or "very good," and 91% say the same of their mental health;
    • Older Canadians tend to worry most about declining health in their later years, with more than four-in-10 over the age of 60 saying they are concerned about facing "new or worsening mobility issues" within the next decade;
    • Younger Canadians, especially younger women, appear more concerned with financial and emotional troubles as they get older. Indeed, 77% of women between the ages of 30 and 55 say they worry about outliving their savings, and seven-in-10 (68%) say the same of outliving their loved ones; and 
    • Roughly two-thirds (66%) of Canadians are at least somewhat worried about outliving their savings, with this sentiment actually cutting across household income levels.
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    • Aug 14, 2019

    Japanese researchers build robotic tail designed to help elderly with balance

    Millions of years after the ancestors of humans evolved to lose their tails, a research team at Japan's Keio University built a robotic one they say could help unsteady elderly people keep their balance.
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    • Aug 14, 2019

    Taipei Elderly Card helps seniors use transportation, pay entrance fees, visit sport centers

    The Taipei Elderly Card has a monthly quota for people aged 65 or older to use on public transportation and entrance fees for certain municipal exhibitions. The card will be accepted at the city's 12 district sports centers, as part of an incentive to encourage older people to exercise. Many people have complained that people older than 80 hardly use the Elderly Card, but statistics show that a large proportion of cardholders closer to 65 years old often use most of their quota every month, Taipei's mayor said, adding that he hopes they could maintain their active lifestyles. In addition, starting in Jan. 2020, people aged 65 or older with an individual income tax rate of less than 20% would receive a subsidy for their National Health Insurance monthly premium, the city government said. The premium subsidy is currently provided to people aged 70 or older, but the eligibility would be expanded to people aged 65 or older, as providing coverage for all older people should be a priority, the mayor said. more info

    • Aug 13, 2019

    Nunavut government developing business case for elder care centers

    The government of the Canadian territory of Nunavut is many months away from being able to start construction of extended-care centers for elders in all three regions of Nunavut. Officials are working on a business case that would describe the size of the planned facilities, their architectural features, proposed construction schedules and how much money the government will ask the Nunavut legislative assembly to approve. If the business case is done in the next four weeks, it’s possible the government could ask MLAs to vote to spend the required money. If not, they may wait until next winter. The government estimates by 2035, the territory will need 156 beds for elders who need long-term care. At the same time, growing numbers of Nunavut seniors require advanced forms of round-the-clock care for various forms of dementia and other chronic conditions. more info

    • Aug 13, 2019

    CABHI will test Quebec-based health care innovations for older adults with dementia

    The Centre for Aging + Brain Health Innovation in collaboration with four academic centers in Quebec will test two health care innovations for older adults, specifically for those living with dementia. The supported innovations are:

    • e.Space - a digital platform that aims to promote brain health in older adults through evidence-based cognitive and behavioral strategies focused on memory, sleep, mental health, nutrition and communication; and
    • OPUS-AP - a best practices program in long-term care centers focusing on the appropriate use of antipsychotics in older adults living with dementia or major neurocognitive disorders.
    more info

    • Aug 13, 2019

    Global Innovation@Home winners include handyman services, building permit program

    The Innovation@Home competition was conducted by Grantmakers in Aging and the WHO Global Network for Age-Friendly Cities and Communities to find the best age-friendly housing innovations that could be implemented around the U.S. The three Innovation@Home winners and the honorable mention are:

    • No-Cost/Low-Cost Building Permit Program of Sausalito, Calif. - Age Friendly Sausalito, a volunteer group of older residents, worked with municipal officials, to create The Age-Friendly Home Adaptation Grant program in 2018. It lets Sausalito homeowners age 60 and older (or those with a disability) get free or reduced-cost building permits for projects of up to $10,000 to improve the safety and accessibility of their residences;
    • Aconchego Home-Matching Program of Porto, Portugal - This program in the university town of Porto matches residents age 60 and older who have extra room in their homes with students ages 18 to 35 who need a place to live. The older people get companionship; the students get free housing. Nearly 400 people have participated in the Aconchego Program since it was launched by Porto City Hall and the Academic Federation of Porto in 2004;
    • Home Refurbishment Program of Barcelona, Spain - The most vulnerable people aged 65 and older in the Barcelona region (other than the city of Barcelona itself) can get non-structural home repairs, mostly in bathrooms and kitchens. The Home Refurbishment Program, run by La Diputació de Barcelona, improves home energy efficiency and provides technology like assistive devices so residents have greater independence and a better quality of life; and
    • CHORE Volunteer Handyman Service of Bergen County, N.J. -  CHORE aims to help residents age 60 and older  (and those with disabilities) in the northern New Jersey county live safely in their homes by performing minor home repairs. Most of the crew volunteers in this 42-year-old program are retirees. CHORE charges clients for parts if the residents can afford it, but not for labor.
    more info

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